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Sir William Withey Gull, 1st Baronet
English physician
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Sir William Withey Gull, 1st Baronet

English physician

Sir William Withey Gull, 1st Baronet, (born Dec. 31, 1816, Colchester, Essex, Eng.—died Jan. 29, 1890, London), leading English physician of his time, lecturer and physician at Guy’s Hospital, London, and an outstanding clinical teacher.

Gull received his M.D. from the University of London in 1846 and became lecturer on physiology and anatomy and then physician, at Guy’s, where he taught or served as consulting physician for the rest of his life. He was a famous and popular teacher, and some of his epigrams are still current. Gull had a successful and fashionable private practice as well—including among his patients Queen Victoria and the Prince of Wales—which made him wealthier than any English physician before his time. He was created a baronet in 1872.

Gull contributed valuable articles to Guy’s Hospital Reports on many clinical subjects, including xanthoma, intermittent hematuria, the treatment of tapeworm (with oil of male fern), hyperthyroidism, and hypochondria. He was one of the first clinicians to describe pathological lesions in tabes dorsalis (1856), intermittent hemoglobinuria (1866), arteriosclerotic atrophy of the kidney (1872; with H.G. Sutton), and myxedema (1873), known as Gull’s disease. He also named and provided a classic description of anorexia nervosa (1874). He believed in minimal use of drugs (“The road to a clinic goes through the pathologic museum and not through the apothecary’s shop”) and defended the use of vivisection and clinical investigation. On circumstantial evidence, Gull has been implicated by modern writers as a possible candidate for the infamous Victorian murderer Jack the Ripper.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.
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